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About Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn Wildlife

Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn Wildlife (BGGW) was set up in 2013 as a community interest company to continue the work of protecting breeding ospreys in the Glaslyn Valley.

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We need your help – Come and volunteer!

We would not be able to continue operating without the invaluable help of our volunteers. If you are able to assist us in any way by devoting some of your time, then please get in touch...

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Help us develop and grow, donate today!

We are a small not for profit Company which relies on donations to keep it operating. Any donation large or small will be greatly appreciated and essential to our survival.

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Latest News and Features

Opening Times

The Pont Croesor Visitor Centre is open every day from 10am until 5pm - we look forward to welcoming you!

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Day 14 of 25. The Glaslyn advent calendar 2017.

For a few weeks back in 2015, we began to worry that there would be no breeding on the Glaslyn nest that season. 11(98) had failed to return from his migration and Mrs G did not appear to approve of most of the male osprey suitors that turned up at the nest to try their luck. Then on 30th April a new unringed male arrived, unlike some of the other males he was willing to share his fish and Mrs G appeared to approve of him. We also gave him the seal of approval.

For the first few days he had a habit of disappearing in the direction of Nant Mor and from the visitor centre it looked like he was heading towards Yr Aran, the mountain peak south of Snowdon. Aran was the obvious choice when we were thinking of a name for our new male.

Aran has to date raised seven chicks to fledging with Mrs G. He has turned out to be a proficient provider, bringing back fish species that we have rarely or never seen at the Glaslyn nest previously, such as Flounder and Garfish. In fact Aran appears to have a fondness for Garfish, having caught over 20 of them in 2016 and the number caught this year was well into the double figures.

BGGW Image 2016
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Day 13 of 25. The Glaslyn advent calendar 2017.

Every now and again, Mother Nature likes to remind us that the land around our visitor centre at Pont Croesor and the ospreys nest are floodplains. Two days of heavy rain, spring tides and a south-westerly gale and what were green fertile fields a few days earlier will be replaced by a mile-wide, three-mile-long lake. Most of the water you can see in this aerial photograph (apart from the Glaslyn river flowing beneath the bridge at the bottom of the image) shouldn’t be there!

Turn back the clock to over two centuries ago and the Glaslyn Valley would have looked very different to the way we and the ospreys see it today. In 1811, the mile-long Cob embankment was built across the sands of the Traeth Mawr estuary in order to construct a roadway and to reclaim 2,830 hectares of land for agriculture. The river Glaslyn was diverted through what eventually became Porthmadog Harbour and a sluice gate system was installed to stop the sea from encroaching on the rich farmland that was created as a result of reclaiming the estuary.

Before 1811, at high tide, the sea would have encircled the rocky outcrop where the Glaslyn ospreys nest is. Fishing would have been much easier for ospreys then!

Photo: Dave Thurlow
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Day 12 of 25. The Glaslyn advent calendar 2017.

The buzzard is now a common and widespread resident throughout Snowdonia and the UK. They have recovered well following years of suffering through persecution and pesticide poisoning during the 20th century.

The buzzard is probably the most commonly seen bird of prey at Pont Croesor. Their plaintive mewing calls are usually the first indicator for us to look towards the skies. They can be seen almost daily soaring above the visitor centre, sometimes in groups of three or four birds.

Photo: Tony Ashton
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