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About Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn Wildlife

Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn Wildlife (BGGW) was set up in 2013 as a community interest company to continue the work of protecting breeding ospreys in the Glaslyn Valley.

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We need your help – Come and volunteer!

We would not be able to continue operating without the invaluable help of our volunteers. If you are able to assist us in any way by devoting some of your time, then please get in touch...

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Help us develop and grow, donate today!

We are a small not for profit Company which relies on donations to keep it operating. Any donation large or small will be greatly appreciated and essential to our survival.

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Latest News and Features

Opening Times

The Pont Croesor Visitor Centre is open every day from 10am until 5pm - we look forward to welcoming you!

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Day 16 of 25. The Glaslyn advent calendar 2017.

All creatures great and small. It’s not only the spectacular birds and animals like Ospreys, Red Kites, Otters and Badgers that make the Glaslyn Valley a great place for nature. Sometimes it is the small creatures that occasionally appear that steal the limelight.

Moths are not everyone’s cup of tea and it’s difficult to get over-excited about them (with apologies to lepidopterists everywhere!). Over 2,500 different moth species have been recorded in the UK and some of them can be stunning and spectacular. In July 2015 for example, a rare Death’s Head Hawk Moth was trapped by Julian Thompson at the BGGW Visitor Centre at Pont Croesor.

The largest and the fastest flying moth in the U.K., the Death’s Head Hawk Moth is a migrant moth from Southern Europe that appears in Wales in very small numbers in late Summer and Autumn. It is a striking moth with a distinctive skull like mark on its thorax, after which it is named. Due to its macabre appearance, it is much celebrated in folklore and in art and literature and appears in the film Silence of the Lambs.

Death’s Head Hawk Moths feed mainly on honey and can move about in hives without being detected because they mimic the scent of the bees.

Photo: Kev Wardlaw
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Day 15 of 25. The Glaslyn advent calendar 2017.

There is always a great deal of excitement whenever a Great Spotted Woodpecker visits the bird feeders, whether it is at the Pont Croesor visitor centre or at the osprey protection site. Visitors and volunteers alike reach for their cameras to try and get a photograph.

During the early springtime they can be heard drumming in the sessile oak woods of Hafod Garegog that adjoin the protection site. In fact it is one of the sounds of spring that regularly accompanies a daytime protection shift and volunteers are always on the lookout for them flying over to the feeders with their distinctive bouncing flight.

This juvenile was photographed by volunteer Anna Fisher during a protection shift.
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Day 14 of 25. The Glaslyn advent calendar 2017.

For a few weeks back in 2015, we began to worry that there would be no breeding on the Glaslyn nest that season. 11(98) had failed to return from his migration and Mrs G did not appear to approve of most of the male osprey suitors that turned up at the nest to try their luck. Then on 30th April a new unringed male arrived, unlike some of the other males he was willing to share his fish and Mrs G appeared to approve of him. We also gave him the seal of approval.

For the first few days he had a habit of disappearing in the direction of Nant Mor and from the visitor centre it looked like he was heading towards Yr Aran, the mountain peak south of Snowdon. Aran was the obvious choice when we were thinking of a name for our new male.

Aran has to date raised seven chicks to fledging with Mrs G. He has turned out to be a proficient provider, bringing back fish species that we have rarely or never seen at the Glaslyn nest previously, such as Flounder and Garfish. In fact Aran appears to have a fondness for Garfish, having caught over 20 of them in 2016 and the number caught this year was well into the double figures.

BGGW Image 2016
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